Around the world, across the globe, there is the ocean that connect us. The surf that many follow as they follow the Self. There is something unattainable in a surfer’s conversation, an inexplicable sensation of their personal encounter with nature. Who are you? Why are you here? Do you understand how you got where you are? Is this the life you want to live? Here comes another ride.

As meditation, surfing can be seen as waves of stillness. A wave will ride you as you ride her, in a flow that challenges your balance and equanimity, it will enlighten you with the laws of nature, the ultimate truth of an ever changing Universe. It will show you that clarity is the journey ahead, it will change any vision you hold as absolute about your final destination, just to teach you that here you are, and that nothing travels faster than the speed of your own energy. By the ocean that washes all your fears in one transient timeless space, you are reminded that we are all surfers of a cosmic wave. This is why you surf, because after all has been said and done, the one thing that feels just right, is your own experience.

The surfer soul surely desires one thing – to surf increasingly bigger waves. After ex- periencing good surf trips, like Teahupo’o, In- donesia, the Maldives, the Tunnels in Kauai, and realizing how well you can surf, the North Shore in winter might be what you are after. So you get your act together, get support from sponsors, focus on where the big wave scene seems to be heading and paddle, because tow- ing might not be enough to impress. Surfing is gnarly, dude. There is nothing like it. Some cities are run by pure hydroelectric power, and you are riding on it. The whole idea of wipe out comes into view as well, when you…wipe out. Some waves are gentle; the big waves, are just power.

Mexico’s Zippers at Costa Azul, is described as a cobblestone right-hand wave that produces 8 to 10 foot waves during the summer. It is mainly a right point beach break and it breaks best on a solid south swell and me- dium tide. It has its best shape at 4 to 5 feet, and the bottom is sand over boulders. The take-off is a short, steep fast drop and then it’s a fast “lippy” wave with a few good sections to hit! The inside is shallow over the rocks with a nice quick barrel section at the beach. The best board to ride is your favourite high-perfor- mance short board. The easiest way to paddle out is from the inside beach break through the channel. On a big day sit way outside! Be care- ful, the connoisseurs advise…ifyou wipe out on the take-off you will end up on the rocks! The best spot to bust air is on the second section towards the middle as the wave picks up speed. Why are you here this June? Los Cabos Open Surf 6-Star ASP in June is a chance to rack up points on ASP’s dream tour and grab a ticket to the World Championship tour. Nobody can deny that Los Cabos is a world class destination that attracts surfers from all over. After all, world champion Mike Doyle did choose our surf as a favourite place on Earth!

An ASP Star event is a lower level of com- petition compared to an ASP Prime event, with their importance indicated by the number of stars they are assigned: more stars means better competition and prize money. ASP World Tour and ASP Women’s World Tour surfers accumulate points from each ASP Star event in which they compete, which counts to- wards their ASP World Ranking. Accumulated points are valid for 12 months from the final date of the scheduled event in which they were earned. ASP World Ranking determines the promotion or relegation of surfers.

A competition requires surfers to display commitment and a degree of difficulty, innovative and progressive manoeuvres, combination of major manoeuvres, variety of manoeuvres, speed, power and flow. These elements may be weighted differently from day to day and event to event, depending upon on the surfing conditions and the type of breaking wave at each event location. This criteria is different from long boarding competitions. All of this is focused on creating some type of consistency that can be seen throughout the many different events.

Surfers are scored on a scale of 0.1 to 10.0. These scores are broken up into increments of one-tenth. The following scale can be used in order to relate descriptions with the score:

0–1.9 = Poor

2.0–3.9 = Fair

4.0–5.9 = Average 6.0–7.9 = Good

8.0–10.0 = Excellent

There are many rules on the water which revolve around the idea of right of way. A surfer has right-of -way if he or she is closer to the area where the wave is break- ing. This is more commonly referred to as having the “in- side position”. If another surfer takes off in front of the surfer who has the inside position, then interference will be called and penalties will be enacted. In most circum- stances, it does not matter who stood up first but who has the inside position.

A surfer can also be found guilty of interference if he or she catches more than the maximum number of waves in a heat, and if this takes away from the other competi- tors ability to catch waves. A competitor is also not al- lowed to interfere with another competitor’s paddling and manoeuvring for a wave.

The rules of right-of-way vary slightly with the type of break. Point breaks will always have a consistent direc-tion of the inside; that is, the person further up the line will have right-of-away. In a single peak situation where there is both a left and a right, two people are able to be on the wave at the same time provided that one goes left, one goes right; and that neither crosses the path of the other. If this does happen, then the surfer who stood up first will get the right-of-way. On a multi- peaked wave where the wave eventually comes together, both peaks can be surfed until the surfers meet. When they do, the surfer who stood up first has right-a-way and the other must manoeuvre to get off of the wave without interrupting the other surfer.

In a one-on-one competition, priority can be declared by the Head Judge. Once the person with priority has paddled for a wave, priority is then turned over to the next person until that surfer does the same. The person with second priority can paddle for waves as long as it does not interfere with the other surfer who will lose their priority only if he or she catches a wave.

A surfer who has already taken off or obtained possession of a wave maintains this posi- tion until the end of the ride. If another surfer takes off on the inside of this surfer, then this person does not obtain priority , and is considered to be “ snaking. ” If this surfer does not hurt the other surfers ride then both people can be scored. If the judges determine that the “snak- ing” did interfere, then the person will be penalized. Interference penalties are called by the judges and must have a majority to be declared an actual penalty. Interference is shown by triangles on the score cards in different ways depending on when or where in the heat they were made. If three or more waves are being scored, then one wave will be dropped off of the score card. If only the top two waves are being scored, then 50% of the second-best scored wave will be taken off. If a surfer has more than one penalty, then 50% of the best wave’s score will be taken off as well. The surfer who has been interfered with will be allowed an additional wave to their maximum, as long as it is within the time limit. If a surfer interferes more than twice in a heat, they must leave the competition area.

Surfing. There is nothing like it. May Cabo waves begin and end in a perfect cycle of balance and bring you happiness. Let’s hope your desire to harness the forces of nature is applied to the service of mankind. Why are you here? Who are you? Do you understand how you got where you are? Is this the life you want live? Here comes another ride. *

References: www.loscabosopenofsurf.com | Association of Surfing Professionals Wikipedia

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